July 10th, 2009

wood cat

Worldcon preliminary programming etiquette, a poll

So I have a preliminary programming schedule from Worldcon. I've already declined one panel item, but there are two others that on reflection I'm not sure about. Thus, I ask you all: if you were either running programming, or going to a con, what would you want me to do?

Poll #1427778 Worldcon preliminary programming etiquette
This poll is closed.

If my reaction to a panel is, "I'm not sure why I'm on this, but I imagine I could dreg up something to say," there are four people total on the panel, and it is about responses to books, should I decline to be on it?

Yes
23(63.9%)
No
10(27.8%)
See comments
3(8.3%)

If my reaction to a panel is, "I feel a bit out of my league on this topic," I am the moderator, and it is about race and discussions thereof, should I decline to be on it?

Yes
8(22.2%)
No
19(52.8%)
See comments
9(25.0%)

Ticky?

English
6(18.2%)
Francais
0(0.0%)
Bilingual
1(3.0%)
Pre-verbal
4(12.1%)
Ticky
4(12.1%)

Also, if it is relevant, I have eight (eight!!) panels total, not counting the one I dropped.

wood cat

Readercon: The Catharsis of Myth, the Shock of Invention

I am having a snack break and thought I would do a minimal cleanup of my panel notes and post them so as not to get completely behind.

The Catharsis of Myth, the Shock of Invention.
Ellen Asher, Theodora Goss (L), Elaine Isaak, Laura Miller, Catherynne M. Valente. [Greatest Hit from Readercon 8.] In writing or reading fiction, we place a high value on the degree to which the plot unfolds in unexpected ways. But much of the power of myth and fairy tale derives from the way it fulfills our expectations. How do the best works of fantasy reconcile these seeming opposites?

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